Tag: featured

Destruction of the Second Temple in 70 C.E. – Tisha B’Av
By October 31, 2016 Read More →

Destruction of the Second Temple in 70 C.E. – Tisha B’Av

The Jewish War 6, 241, 251-56 Toward the end of 69 or the beginning of 70, Vespasian appointed Tiberius Julius Alexander to the staff of his son Titus, who was in charge of the war against the Jews. In Josephus’ eyes, this was a distinction and a token of gratitude on the emperor’s part toward […]

The Destruction of King Solomon’s Temple
By August 16, 2016 Read More →

The Destruction of King Solomon’s Temple

The Land of Israel is a natural bridge between the African and Eurasian continents, not only in terms of territory, but also between different peoples, cultures, languages and religions.  It has been the focus of so much attention, the home of so many nations, and the stage for many events that have shaped world history.  […]

Haftarah Introduction, Bryna Jocheved Levy
By January 6, 2016 Read More →

Haftarah Introduction, Bryna Jocheved Levy

WHAT’S A HAFTARAH? The haftarah or haftorah is the selection from the books of the Prophets (Nevi’im)  read publicly in the synagogue following the Torah reading on Sabbath and Jewish holidays. The word haftarah derives from the Hebrew word meaning “parting” or “taking leave” since it concludes the scriptural readings in the morning Sabbath and […]

Rachel Hachlili, “Synagogues: Before and After the Roman Destruction of the Temple,” Biblical Archaeology Review 41:03, May/Jun 2015.
By November 2, 2015 Read More →

Rachel Hachlili, “Synagogues: Before and After the Roman Destruction of the Temple,” Biblical Archaeology Review 41:03, May/Jun 2015.

Were there synagogues while the Temple still stood in Jerusalem? Nearly 200 ancient synagogues have been discovered by archaeologists at numerous sites in the Land of Israel as well as in the diaspora. After the Roman destruction of the Jerusalem Temple in 70 C.E., the major architectural feature of the synagogue was the Torah Shrine. […]

Biblical History: Jeremiah, Ezra and Esther, c. 586-330 BCE, Steven Feldman, COJS.
By April 14, 2008 0 Comments Read More →

Biblical History: Jeremiah, Ezra and Esther, c. 586-330 BCE, Steven Feldman, COJS.

Like the Northern Kingdom of Israel, the Southern Kingdom of Judah, too, had come to an end. Both had been caught in similar predicaments- how to negotiate the treacherous diplomatic waters of a small power caught between two international superpowers on either side of it. Both small kingdoms had succeeded for a while at picking […]

The Daily Life of the Jew
By April 9, 2008 0 Comments Read More →

The Daily Life of the Jew

Excerpted from Lawrence H. Schiffman, From Text to Tradition, Ktav Publishing House, Hoboken, NJ, 1991. The rabbis sought to sanctify all of man’s actions, even the most mundane. Accordingly, it was expected that such matters as personal hygiene and dress would come under the halakhah as well as matters usually understood as “religious” in the modern sense. […]

Jerusalem Talmud Haggigah 2:1 (77a-77c): Four Who Entered the Pardes
By April 9, 2008 0 Comments Read More →

Jerusalem Talmud Haggigah 2:1 (77a-77c): Four Who Entered the Pardes

Greco-Roman Period The following aggadic narrative demonstrates the reasons for the Rabbinic hesitation to teach esoteric traditions. After Elisha ben Abuyah becomes an apostate, his student Rabbi Meir continues to respect his immense learning while feeling the pain of his loss to the Rabbinic community of sages. Four entered the Pardes- 215 One peeked and […]

Posted in: Uncategorized
Baruch 1-2: The Destruction of the Temple and the Exile
By April 8, 2008 0 Comments Read More →

Baruch 1-2: The Destruction of the Temple and the Exile

1These are the words of the book that Baruch son of Neriah son of Mahseiah son of Zedekiah son of Hasadiah son of Hilkiah wrote in Babylon, 2 in the fifth year, on the seventh day of the month, at the time when the Chaldeans took Jerusalem and burned it with fire. 3 Baruch read […]