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Further Reading on Jewish Mysticism and Esotericsm

Moses Cordovero Shaarei OrahAbrams, Daniel. “A History of the Unique Cherub.” The Jewish Quarterly Review 90, no. 3/4. 2 (April 2000): 397-403.

____­_. “From Divine Shape to Angelic Being: The Career of Akatriel in Jewish Literature.” The Journal of Religion 76, no. 1 (January 1996): 43-63.

­­____­_. “The Boundaries of Divine Ontology: The Inclusion and Exclusion of Metatron in the Godhead.” The Harvard Theological Review 87, no. 3 (July 1994): 291-321.

 

____­_.. “Critical and Post-Critical Textual Scholarship of Jewish Mystical Literature: Notes on the History and Development of Modern Editing Techniques.” Kabbalah: Journal for the Study of Jewish Mystical Texts 1 (1996): 17–71.

 

_____. “Knowing the Maiden without Eyes: Reading the Sexual Reconstruction of the Jewish Mystic in a Zoharic Parable.” Da‘at 50-52 (2003): lix-lxxxiii.

 

_____. Sexual Symbolism and Merkavah Speculation in Medieval Germany: A Study of the Sod Ha-Egoz Texts. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 1997.

 

_____.”The condensation of the symbol “Shekhinah” in the manuscripts of the “Book Bahir”.  Kabbalah 16 (2007) 7-82.

 

_____.”Defining modern academic scholarship : Gershom Scholem and the establishment of a new (?) discipline.”  Journal of Jewish Thought & Philosophy 9,2 (2000) 267-302.

 

_____.”The dimensions of the Creator – contradiction or paradox? Corruptions and accretions to the manuscript witnesses.”  Kabbalah 5 (2000) 35-53.

 

_____.”The evolution of the intention of prayer to the “Special Cherub” : from the earliest works to a late unknown treatise.”  Frankfurter Judaistische Beiträge 22 (1995) 1-26.

 

_____.”From Germany to Spain : numerology as a mystical technique.”  Journal of Jewish Studies 47,1 (1996) 85-101.

 

_____.”’A light of her Own’ : Minor Kabbalistic Traditions on the Ontology of the Divine Feminine.”  Kabbalah 15 (2006) 7-29.

 

_____.”’Ma’aseh Merkabah’ as a literary work : the reception of Hekhalot traditions by the German Pietists and kabbalistic reinterpretation.”  Jewish Studies Quarterly 5,4 (1998) 329-345.

 

_____.”A neglected talmudic reference to Maase Merkava.”  Frankfurter Judaistische Beiträge 26 (1999) 1-5.

 

_____.”New study tools from the Kabbalists of today : toward an appreciation of the history and role of collectanea, paraphrases and graphic representations in kabbalistic literature.”  Journal des Études de la Cabale 1 (1997).

 

_____.” Orality in the kabbalistic school of Nahmanides : preserving and interpreting esoteric traditions and texts.”  Jewish Studies Quarterly 3,1 (1996) 85-102.

 

_____.” Presenting and representing Gershom Scholem : a review essay.”  Modern Judaism 20,2 (2000) 226-243.

 

_____.” Recent translations of kabbalistic texts.”  Henoch 18,1-2 (1996) 197-204.

 

_____.” Some phenomenological considerations on the “account of creation” in Jewish mystical literature.”  Kabbalah 10 (2004) 7-19.

 

_____.” Special angelic figures : the career of the beasts of the throne-world in “Hekhalot” literature, German pietism and early kabbalistic literature.”  Revue des Etudes Juives 155,3-4 (1996) 363-400.

Abulafia, Abraham. Get Ha-Shemot – Divorce of the Names. Providence University, 2007.

            ____­_.Ner Elohim – Candle of God. Providence University, 2007.

____­_.Sefer Ha-Ot – The Book of the Sign. Providence University, 2007.

____­_. Sheva Netivot Ha-Torah – The Seven Paths of Torah by Abraham Abulafia. Bilingual. Providence University, 2007.

Agus, Jacob B. “Scholem’s “Kabbalah”.” The Jewish Quarterly Review 66, no. 4. 2 (April 1976): 242-244.

Alter, Judah Aryeh Leib, Arthur Green, and Shai Gluskin. The Language of Truth: The Torah Commentary of Sefat Emet. Jewish Publication Society of America, 1998.

Alter, Robert. “Scholem and Modernism.” Poetics Today 15, no. 3 (Autumn 1994): 429-442.

Altmann, Alexander. “God and Self in Jewish Mysticism.” Judaism 3 (1954): 1–5.

 

_____. Studies in Religious Philosophy and Mysticism. Ithaca: Cornell University

Press, 1969.

 

_____.”’Ars rhetorica’ as reflected in some Jewish figures of the Italian Renaissance.”  Jewish Thought in the Sixteenth Century (1983) 1-22.

 

_____.” Creation and emanation in Isaac Israeli : a reappraisal.”  Studies in Medieval Jewish History and Literature I (1979) 1-15.

 

_____.” The divine attributes : an historical survey of the Jewish discussion.”  Judaism 15 (1966) 40-60.

 

_____.”Gershom Scholem, 1897-1982.”  Proceedings – American Academy for Jewish Research 51 (1984) 1-14.

 

_____.”Homo imago Dei in Jewish and Christian theology.”  Journal of Religion 48 (1968) 235-259.

 

_____.” The Ladder of Ascension.”  Studies in Mysticism and Religion (1967) 1-32.

 

_____.”Lurianic Kabbala in a Platonic key : Abraham Cohen Herrera’s “Puerta del Cielo.”  Hebrew Union College Annual 53 (1983) 317-355.

 

Altshuler, Mor. The Messianic Secret of Hasidism. Brill Academic Publishers, 2006.

Anidjar, Gil. “Our Place in Al-Andalus”: Kabbalah, Philosophy, Literature In. Cultural memory in the present. Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press, 2002.

Ariel, David S. “‘The Eastern Dawn of Wisdom’: The Problem of the Relation Between Islamic and Jewish Mysticism.” In Approaches to Judaism in Medieval Times, Volume 2, 149–167. Edited by David R. Blumenthal. Chico, CA: Scholars Press, 1985.

Baer, Yitzhak. A History of the Jews in Christian Spain. Translated by Louis Schoffman. 2 vols. Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society of America, 1961.

Beitchman, Philip. Alchemy of the Word: Cabala of the Renaissance. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1998.

Belcove-Shalin, Janet S. New World Hasidism: Ethnographic Studies of Hasidic Jews in America. State University of New York Press, 1995.

Ben-Amos, Dan, and Jerome R. Mintz. In Praise of the Baal Shem Tov. Jason Aronson, 1994.

Ben-Horin, Meir. “The Ineffable: Critical Notes on Neo-Mysticism.” The Jewish Quarterly Review 46, no. 4. 2 (April 1956): 321-354.

Ben-Shlomo, Yosef. “The Spiritual Universe of Gershom Scholem.” Modern Judaism 5, no. 1, Gershom Scholem Memorial Issue (February 1985): 21-38.

Benin, Stephen D. The Footprints of God: Divine Accommodation in Jewish and Christian Thought. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1993.

 

_____.” The mutability of an immutable God : exegesis and individual capacity in the Zohar and several Christian sources.”  International Conference on the History of Jewish Mysticism III (1989) 67-86.

Biale, David. “Ejaculatory Prayer: The Displacement of Sexuality in Chassidism.” Tikkun 6, no. 4 (1991): 21–5.

_____. “Shabbtai Zvi and the Seductions of Jewish Orientalism.” Jerusalem Studies in Jewish Thought 17, no. 2 (2001): 85–110.

_____.. “The Lust for Asceticism in the Hasidic Movement.” Jewish Explorations of Sexuality (1995).

_____. Gershom Scholem: Kabbalah and Counter-History. 2nd ed. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1982.

_____. “Gershom Scholem’s Ten Unhistorical Aphorisms on Kabbalah: Text and Commentary.” Modern Judaism 5, no. 1, Gershom Scholem Memorial Issue (February 1985): 67-93.

Bloom, Harold. Kabbalah and Criticism. New York: Seabury Press, 1975.

 

Bilski, E. D., and M. Idel. “The Golem: An Historical Overview.” Golem! Danger, Deliverance and Art: 10–14.

 

Bokser, Ben Zion. The Jewish Mystical Tradition. New York: Pilgrim Press, 1981.

 

Brody, Seth L. “Human Hands Dwell in Heavenly Heights: Contemplative Ascent and Theurgic Power in Thirteenth Century Kabbalah.” In Mystics of the Book: Themes, Topics and Typologies,  123–158. Edited by Robert A. Herrera. New York: Peter Lang, 1993.

 

_____. “Human Hands Dwell in Heavenly Heights: Worship and Mystical Experience in Thirteenth-Century Kabbalah,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Pennsylvania, 1991.

Bronstein, Léo. Kabbalah and Art. Hanover, N.H: Brandeis University Press : distributed by University Press.

Busi, Giulio, Palazzo della ragione Mantova, and Casa italiana Zerilli-Marimo. Mantova E La Qabbalah = Mantua and the Kabbalah. Milano: Skira, 2001.

Cahnman, Werner J. “Friedrich Wilhelm Schelling and the New Thinking of Judaism.” InKabbala und Romantik, 167–205. Edited by Eveline Goodman-Thau, Gert Mattenklott, and Christoph Schulte. Tübingen: Max Niemeyer Verlag, 1994.

 

Cardozo, Abraham Miguel. Abraham Miguel Cardozo: Selected Writings. Classics of Western spirituality. New York: Paulist Press, 2001.

Carlebach, Elisheva. Between History and Hope: Jewish Messianism in Ashkenaz and Sepharad. Lectures of the Victor J. Selmanowitz Chair of Jewish History. New York, NY: Graduate School of Jewish Studies, Touro College, 1998.

_____. The Pursuit of Heresy: Rabbi Moses Hagiz and the Sabbatian Controversies. New York: Columbia University Press, 1990.

_____. “Two Amens That Delayed the Redemption: Jewish Messianism and Popular Spirituality in the Post-Sabbatian Century.” The Jewish Quarterly Review 82, no. 3/4. 2 (April 1992): 241-261.

Chajes, Jeffrey H. Between Worlds: Dybbuks, Exorcists, and Early Modern Judaism. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2003.

Chernus, Ira. Mysticism in Rabbinic Judaism: Studies in the History of Midrash. Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter, 1982.

_____.”A wall of fire round about” : the development of a theme in rabbinic midrash.”  Journal of Jewish Studies 30,1 (1979) 68-84.

Cohen, Aryeh, and Shaul Magid. Beginning/Again: Toward a Hermeneutics of Jewish Texts. Chatham House Publishers, 2002.Cohen, Martin S. The Shi’ur Qomah: Liturgy and Theurgy in Pre-Kabbalistic Jewish Mysticism. Lanham: University Press of America, 1983.

 

_____. The Shi’ur Qomah: Texts and Recensions. Tübingen: Mohr, 1985.

 

Cohn, Jacob. “Mystic Experience and Elijah-Revelation in Talmudic Times.” In Meyer Waxman Jubilee Volume On the Occasion of His Seventy-fifth Birthday, 34–44 (English section). Edited by Judah Rosenthal, Leonard C. Nishkin, and David S. Shapiro.Jerusalem and Tel-Aviv: Mordecai Newman Publishing House Ltd., 1966.

Cohn-Sherbok, Dan. Kabbalah and Jewish Mysticism: An Introductory Anthology. 2Rev Ed. Oneworld Publications, 2006.

Cordovero, Moses ben Jacob. Moses Cordovero’s Introduction to Kabbalah: An Annotated Translation of His. Sources and studies in Kabbalah, Hasidism, and Jewish thought. New York: Michael Scharf Pub. Trust of Yeshiva Univ. Press.

 

Corse, Taylor, and Allison P. Coudert. The Alphabet of Nature: By F.M. Van Helmont (Aries Book Series). Brill Academic Publishers, 2007.

Coudert, Allison. “A Quaker-Kabbalist Controversy: George Fox’s Reaction to Francis Mercury van Helmont.” Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 39 (1976): 171-189.

_____. Leibniz and the Kabbalah. Dordrect: Kluwer Academic, 1995.

_____. The Impact of the Kabbalah in the Seventeenth Century: The Life and Thought. Brill’s series in Jewish studies. Leiden: Brill, 1999.

_____. Sarah Hutton, Gordon M. Weiner, and Richard H. Popkin. Judaeo-Christian Intellectual Culture in the Seventeenth Century: A Celebration of the Library of Narcissus Marsh (1638-1713). 1. Springer, 1999.

_____. and Jeffrey S. Shoulson. Hebraica Veritas?: Christian Hebraists and the Study of Judaism in Early Modern Europe. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004.

 

_____.”Five seventeenth-century Christian Hebraists.”  Hebraica veritas? I (2004) 286-308.

 

_____.”Judaizing in the seventeenth century : Francis Mercury van Helmont and Johann Peter Späth (Moses Germanus).”  Secret Conversions to Judaism in Early Modern Europe (2004) 71-121.

 

_____.”The Kabbala denudata : converting Jews or seducing Christians.”  Jewish Christians and Christian Jews (1994) 73-96.

 

_____.”Kabbalistic messianism versus kabbalistic enlightenment.”  Millenarianism and Messianism in Early Modern European Culture I (2001) 107-124.

 

_____.”Leibniz et Christian Knorr von Rosenroth : une amitié méconnue.”  Revue de l’Histoire des Religions 213,4 (1996) 467-484.

 

_____.”Leibniz, Locke, Newton and the Kabbalah.”  The Christian Kabbalah (1997) 149-179.

 

_____.”Seventeenth-century Christian Hebraists : philosemites or antisemites?”  Judaeo-Christian Intellectual Culture in the Seventeenth Century (1999) 43-69.

 

Covino, William A. “Grammars of Transgression: Golems, Cyborgs, and Mutants.” Rhetoric Review 14, no. 2 (Spring 1996): 355-373.

 

Dan, Joseph.  The Christian Kabbalah: Jewish Mystical Books & Their Christian. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard College Library, 1997.

 

_____. Creation and re-creation in Jewish thought : Festschrift in honor of Joseph Dan on the occasion of his seventieth birthday / edited by Rachel Elior and Peter Schäfer.  Tübingen : Mohr Siebeck, c2005

 

­­            _____“Elior’s “Theory of Divinity in Habad”.” The Jewish Quarterly Review 77, no. 2/3. 2 (January 1986): 209-212.

 

_____. The Early Kabbalah / edited and introduced by Joseph Dan ; texts translated by Ronald C. Kiener ; preface by Moshe Idel.  New York : Paulist Press, c1986.

 

_____.Gershom Scholem and the mystical dimension of Jewish history.  New York : New York University Press, 1987.

_____. “Gershom Scholem’s Reconstruction of Early Kabbalah.” Modern Judaism 5, no. 1, Gershom Scholem Memorial Issue (February 1985): 39-66.

_____. Jewish Mysticism and Jewish Ethics. 2nd. Jason Aronson, 1977.

 

_____. Jewish mysticism.  Northvale, N.J. : Jason Aronson, c1998-c1999.

_____. Kabbalah: A Very Short Introduction. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.

_____. Nahman of Bratslav: The Tales. New Ed. Paulist Press, 1978.

_____. “Samael, Lilith, and the Concept of Evil in Early Kabbalah.” AJS Review 5 (1980): 17-40.

_____. “Scholem’s View of Jewish Messianism.” Modern Judaism 12, no. 2 (May 1992): 117-128.

_____. The Heart and the Fountain: An Anthology of Jewish Mystical Experiences. Oxford University Press, USA, 2003.

 

_____. The revelation of the secret of the world : the beginning of Jewish mysticism in late antiquity. Providence, R.I. : Brown University, Program in Judaic Studies, 1992.

_____. The Teachings of Hasidism. Behrman House Publishing, 1996.

_____. The ‘Unique Cherub’ Circle: A School of Mystics and Esoterics in Medieval. Tubingen: Mohr Siebeck, 1999.

            _____.Studies in Jewish Thought. Binah. New York: Praeger, 1989.

 

_____.“The ancient Heikhalot mystical texts in the Middle Ages : tradition, source, inspiration.”  Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library 75,3 (1993) 83-96.

 

_____.”Armilus : the Jewish Antichrist and the origins and dating of the “Sefer Zerubbavel.”  Toward the Millennium (1998) 73-104.

 

_____.”The Ashkenazi Hasidic concept of language.”  Hebrew in Ashkenaz (1993) 11-25.

 

_____.” The Ashkenazi Hasidic “Gates of Wisdom.”  Hommage à Georges Vajda (1980) 183-189.

 

_____.” Ashkenazi Hasidim, 1941-1991 : was there really a hasidic movement in medieval Germany?”  Gershom Scholem’s “Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism” (1993) 87-101.

 

_____.” Ashkenazi Hasidism and the Maimonidean controversy.”  Maimonidean Studies 3 (1995) 29-47.”

 

_____.“Beyond the Kabbalistic Symbol.” Jerusalem Studies in Jewish Thought 5 (1986): 363–385 (Hebrew).

 

_____.” The Book of Divine Glory by Rabbi Judah of Regensburg.”  Studies in Jewish Manuscripts (1999) 1-18.

 

_____.” The Book of the Divine Name by Rabbi Eleazar of Worms.”  Frankfurter Judaistische Beiträge 22 (1995) 27-60.

 

_____.” A bow to Frumkinian Hasidism.”  Modern Judaism 11,2 (1991) 175-193.

 

_____.” Chaos theory, Lyotard’s history and the future of the study of the history of ideas.”  Jewish Studies Quarterly 3,3 (1996) 193-211.

 

_____.” Christian Kabbalah : from mysticism to esotericism.”  Jewish Mysticism III (1999) 191-207

 

_____.” The concept of history in Hekhalot and Merkabah literature.”  Binah 1 (1989) 47-57.

 

_____.” The concept of knowledge in the “Shi’ur Qomah”  Studies in Jewish Religious and Intellectual History (1979) 67-73.

 

 

_____.” The contemporary hasidic Zaddik : charisma, heredity, magic and miracle.”  Divine Intervention and Miracles (1996) 195-214.

 

_____.” The dangers of the mystical ascension in ancient Jewish mystical texts.”  Jewish Mysticism I (1998) 261-309.

 

_____.” The desert in Jewish mysticism : the kingdom of Samael.”  Ariel 40 (1976) 38-43.

 

_____.” The emergence of messianic mythology in 13th century Kabbalah in Spain.”  Occident and Orient (1988) 57-68.

 

_____.” The emergence of mystical prayer.”  Studies in Jewish Mysticism (1982) 85-120.

 

_____.” The epic of a millennium : Judeo-Spanish culture’s confrontations.”  Judaism 41,2 (1992) 113-129.

 

_____.” Gershom Scholem – between history and historiosophy.”  Binah 2 (1989) 219-249.

 

_____.” Gershom Scholem – between mysticism and scholarship.”  Jewish Mysticism IV (1999) 225-258.

 

_____.” Hasidism : the third century.”  Hasidism Reappraised (1996) 415-426

 

_____.” Hebrew ethical literature and via mystica.”  Expérience et écriture mystiques (2000) 77-88.

 

_____.”Hebrew versions of medieval prose romances.”  Hebrew University Studies in Literature and the Arts 6, 1 (1978) 1-9.

 

_____.”Hokhmath ha-Egoz” : its origin and development.”  Journal of Jewish Studies 17 (1966) 73-82.

 

_____.”Imago Dei.”  Jewish Mysticism III (1999) 71-77.

 

_____.”In quest of a historical definition of mysticism : the contingental approach.”  Studies in Spirituality 3 (1993) 58-90.

 

_____.” Jewish Gnosticism?”  Jewish Studies Quarterly 2,4 (1995) 309-328.

 

_____.” The Jewish messianic aspects of Marxist utopianism.”  Jewish Mysticism IV (1999) 259-278.

 

_____.” Jewish mysticism in late antiquity : introduction.”  Jewish Mysticism I (1998) ix-xxvii.

 

_____.” The Kabbalah of Johannes Reuchlin and its historical significance.”  The Christian Kabbalah (1997) 55-95.

 

_____.” Kabbalistic and gnostic dualism.”  Binah 3 (1994) 19-33.

 

_____.” The language of Creation and its grammar.”  Jewish Mysticism I (1998) 129-154.

 

_____.” The language of mystical prayer.”  Studies in Spirituality 5 (1995) 40-60.

 

_____.” The language of the mystics in medieval Germany.”  Mysticism, Magic and Kabbalah (1995) 6-27.

 

_____.” Manasseh ben Israel’s “Nishmat hayyim” and the concept of evil in 17th-century Jewish thought.”  Jewish Thought in the Seventeenth Century (1987) 63-75.

 

_____.” Menasseh ben Israel : attitude towards the Zohar and Lurianic kabbalah.”  Menasseh ben Israel and His World (1989) 199-206.

 

_____.” Midrash and the dawn of Kabbalah.”  Midrash and Literature (1986) 127-139.

 

_____.” Mysticism in Jewish history.”  Studies in Jewish Mysticism (1982) 1-14.

 

_____.” Nahmanides and the development of the concept of evil in the Kabbalah.”  Mossé ben Nahman i el seu temps (1994) 159-182.

 

_____.” The name of God, the name of the rose, and the concept of language in Jewish mysticism.”  Medieval Encounters 2,3 (1996) 228-248.

 

_____.” No evil descends from heaven’ : sixteenth-century Jewish concepts of evil.”  Jewish Thought in the Sixteenth Century (1983) 89-105.

 

_____.” Paradox of nothingness in the Kabbalah.”  Argumentum e silentio (1987) 359-363.

 

_____.” “Pesaq ha-Yirah veha-Emunah” and the intention of prayer in Ashkenazi hasidic esotericism.
 Frankfurter Judaistische Beiträge 19 (1991-1992) 185-215.

 

_____.” Prayer as text and prayer as mystical experience.”  Torah and Wisdom (1992) 33-47.

 

_____.” Pseudepigraphy in medieval Jewish mysticism in Germany.”  Fälschungen im Mittelalter V (1988) 519-531.

 

_____.” Rabbi Judah the Pious and Caesarius of Heisterbach : common motifs in their stories.”  Scripta Hierosolymitana 22 (1971) 18-27.

 

_____.” Rabbi Nahman’s third beggar.”  History and Literature (2002) 41-53.

 

_____.” Rashi and the Merkabah.”  Rashi (1993) 259-264.

 

_____.” The religious experience of the Merkavah.”  Jewish Spirituality I (1986) 289-307.

 

_____.” Samael and the problem of Jewish Gnosticism.”  Perspectives on Jewish Thought and Mysticism (1998) 257-276.

 

_____.” Samael, Lilith, and the concept of evil in early Kabbalah.”  AJS Review 5 (1980) 17-40

 

_____.” Scholem’s view of Jewish messianism.”  Modern Judaism 12,2 (1992) 117-128.

 

_____.” The seventy names of Metatron.”  World Congress of Jewish Studies 8,3 (1982) 19-23.

 

_____.”Shevet Yehuda” : past and future history.”  Jewish Mysticism IV (1999) 25-56.

 

_____.” Three phases of the history of the Sefer Yezira.”  Frankfurter Judaistische Beiträge 21 (1994) 7-29.

 

_____.” The two meanings of hasidic messianism.”  Hesed ve-Emet (1998) 391-407.

 

_____.” Yaldabaoth and the language of the Gnostics.”  Geschichte – Tradition – Reflexion I (1996) 557-564.

 

_____.” Yaldabaoth, once more.”  Threescore and Ten (1991) 123-131.

 

Dauber, Jonathan Victor. Standing on the Heads of Philosophers: Myth and Philosophy in Early Kabbalah, Ph.D. Dissertation, New York University, 2004.

Davis, Joseph. “The “Ten Questions” of Eliezer Eilburg and the Problem of Jewish Unbelief in the 16th Century.” The Jewish Quarterly Review 91, no. 3/4. 2 (April 2001): 293-336.

_____. “Philosophy, Dogma, and Exegesis in Medieval Ashkenazic Judaism: The Evidence of “Sefer Hadrat Qodesh”.” AJS Review 18, no. 2 (1993): 195-222.

DeLeón-Jones, Karen Silvia. Giordano Bruno and the Kabbalah: Prophets, Magicians, and Rabbis. Yale studies in hermeneutics. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1997.

Deutsch, Nathaniel. The Maiden of Ludmir: A Jewish Holy Woman and Her World. Foreword by Janusz Bardach. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003.

Deutsch, Yaacov, “New Evidence of Early Versions of Toldot Yeshu.” Tarbiz 69 (2000): 177–197.

Diamond, Eliezer. Holy Men and Hunger Artists: Fasting and Asceticism in Rabbinic Culture. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Diamond, James A. Maimonides and the Hermeneutics of Concealment : Deciphering Scripture and Midrash in the Guide of the Perplexed. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2002.

Dimant, Deborah. “Men as Angels: The Self-Image of the Qumran Community.” In Religion and Politics in the Ancient Near East, 93–103. Edited by Adela Berlin. Bethesda, 1996.

Dobbs-Weinstein, Idrit. “Matter as Creature and Matter as the Source of Evil: Maimonides and Aquinas.” In Neoplatonism and Jewish Thought, 217–235. Edited by Lenn E. Goodman. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1992.

 

Dresner, Samuel H. The Zaddik. London, New York: Abelard-Schuman, 1960.

 

Drob, Sanford L. Kabbalistic Metaphors: Jewish Mystical Themes in Ancient and Modern Thought. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson Inc., 2000.

 

_____. Symbols of the Kabbalah: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson, 2000.

 

Dynner, Glenn. Men of Silk: The Hasidic Conquest of Polish Jewish Society. Oxford University Press, USA, 2006.

 

Elior, Rachel. “The Jerusalem Temple.” Studies in Spirituality 11, no. 0 (2005): 126-143.

_____. “Absent Presence, Still Nature and a Beautiful Maiden with No Eyes: The Exclusion of Women from the Holy Language, Jewish Religion and the Israeli Realm.” Will You Listen to My Voice: 42–83.

_____. “From Earthly Temple to Heavenly Shrines: Prayer and Sacred Song in the Hekhalot Literature and Its Relation to Temple Traditions.” Jewish Studies Quarterly 4 (1997): 230.

_____. “HaBaD: The Contemplative Ascent to God.” Jewish Spirituality: From the Sixteenth Century Revival to the Present.

_____. “Merkabah Mysticism.” Numen 37, no. 2 (1990): 233-249.

_____. “Mysticism, Magic and Angelology: The Perception of Angels in Hekhalot Literature.” Jewish Studies Quarterly 1 (1993): 3-53.

_____. “The Concept of God in Hekhalot Mysticism.” Binah: Studies in Jewish Thought II: 421-80.

_____. “The Lubavitch Messianic Resurgence: The Historical and Mystical Background.” Toward the Millenium (1998).

_____. The Sabbatian movement and its aftermath. Institute of Jewish Studies, Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

_____. Freeing the Spirit: The Mystical Origins of Hasidism. Littman Library of Jewish, 2008.

_____. Jewish Mysticism: The Infinite Expression of Freedom. Littman Library of Jewish, 2007.

_____. The Paradoxical Ascent to God: The Kabbalistic Theosophy of Habad Hasidism. New Ed. State University of New York Press, 1992.

_____. The Three Temples: On the Emergence of Jewish Mysticism. New Ed. Littman Library of Jewish, 2005.

_____. and Peter Schafer. Creation & Re-creation in Jewish Thought: Festschrift in Honor of Joseph Dan. Paul Mohr Verlag, 2005.

_____. “Between Yesh and Ayin: The Doctrine of the Zaddik in the Works of Jacob Isaac, the Seer of Lublin.” Jewish History: Essays in Honor of Chimen Abramsky: 393–456.

_____. “The Theory of Divinity in HaBaD Hasidism (Heb.; Jerusalem, 1982), p. 34n44; and Arthur Green.” Devotion and Commandment: 62–64.

 

Elqayam, Avraham. “On the ‘Knowledge of Messiah’—The Dialectic of the Erotic Peak in the Messianic Thought of Nathan of Gaza.” Tarbiz 65 (1996): 665-685.

Eskola, Timo. Messiah and the Throne: Jewish Merkabah Mysticism and Christian Exaltation Discourse. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2001.

 

Etkes, Immanuel. Rabbi Israel Salanter and the Mussar Movement. 1st English Ed. Jewish Publications Society, 1993.

_____. The Besht: Magician, Mystic, and Leader. Brandeis, 2004.

_____. The Gaon of Vilna: The Man and His Image. University of California Press, 2002.

_____. Within Hasidic Circles: Studies in Hasidism in Memory of Mordecai Wilensky. The Bialik Institute, 1999.

 

Faierstein, Morris M. “Abraham Jagel’s “Leqah Tov” and Its History.” The Jewish Quarterly Review 89, no. 3/4. 2 (April 1999a): 319-350.

_____.  “Hasidism. The Last Decade in Research.” Modern Judaism 11, no. 1, Review of Developments in Modern Jewish Studies, Part 2 (February 1991): 111-124.

_____.  All Is in the Hands of Heaven: The Teachings of Rabbi Mordecai Joseph Leiner of Izbica. Ktav Pub Inc, 1989.

_____. “Hayyim Ben Joseph Vital, and Isaac Judah Jehiel Safrin.” Jewish Mystical Autobiographies: Book of Visions and Book of Secrets. Paulist Press, 1999.

 

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