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Early Christianity within Second Temple Period Judaism

  1. Capernaum SynagogueFrom Text to Tradition
    1. The Rise of the Early Church
  2. Historical surveys
    1. Shaye Cohen. “Roman Domination- The Jewish Revolt and the Destruction of the Second Temple.” Part IV
  3. Primary sources
    1. Mark 1-13- The Teachings of Jesus
    2. Matthew 1-2- The Birth of Jesus (EText Center)
    3. Luke 2-39-52- Jesus’ Early Experience with the Temple (EText Center)
    4. Luke 4-14-5-39- Jesus Heals the Sick, Performs Miracles and Admonishes the Pharisees (EText Center)
    5. Luke 6- 1-11- The Jewish Observance of Jesus and his Disciples (EText Center)
    6. Luke 6- 12-49- Jesus’ Message of Peace (EText Center)
    7. Luke 10-25-11-4- The Good Samaritan (EText Center)
    8. Luke 19-29-48- Jesus Enters the Temple (EText Center)
    9. Luke 22-47-23- The Betrayal and Crucifixion of Jesus (EText Center)
    10. Luke 24- The Resurrection of Jesus (EText Center)
  4. Secondary sources
    1. Vassilios Tzaferis. “Crucifixion—The Archaeological Evidence.” Biblical Archaeology Review 11, 1 (1985).
    2. Joe Zias. Crucifixion in Antiquity- The Anthropological Evidence.
    3. Stephen J. Patterson. “The Dark Side of Pilate.” Bible Review 19, 6 (2003).
    4. Jonathan Klawans. “Was Jesus’ Last Supper a Seder?” Bible Review 17, 5 (2001).
    5. Joseph A. Fitzmyer. “Did Jesus Speak Greek?” Biblical Archaeology Review 18, 5 (1992).
    6. William Sanford La Sor. “Discovering What Jewish Miqva’ot Can Tell Us about Christian Baptism.” Biblical Archaeology Review 13, 1 (1987)
    7. Paula Fredriksen. “Did Jesus Oppose the Purity Laws?” Bible Review 11, 3 (1995).
    8. The Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament, James C. VanderKam, BAR 41:02, Mar/Apr 2015.
  5. Images
    1. Heel bone of a crucified man, discovered on French Hill, Jerusalem.
    2. The Pontius Pilate Inscription, Caesarea Maritima, dedicated to the Emperor Tiberius
    3. Coin of the Roman procurator Pontius Pilate, ruled 26-37 CE portraying a staff, 31 CE.
    4. Augustus.
    5. Sardis.
    6. Laodicaea.

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