Archive for March, 2016

Louis H. Feldman. “The Omnipresence of the God-Fearers.” Biblical Archaeology Review 12, 5 (1986).
By March 31, 2016 Read More →

Louis H. Feldman. “The Omnipresence of the God-Fearers.” Biblical Archaeology Review 12, 5 (1986).

Reverend MacLennan and Dean Kraabel have performed a real service by questioning the view, so commonly held, that in antiquity there was a large class of gentiles, the so-called God-fearers, who stood somewhere between paganism and Judaism.(1) What we call God-fearers, as MacLennan and Kraabel recognize, actually refers to several Greek terms. In the Book […]

Posted in: Greco-Roman Period
Robert F. Tannenbaum. “Jews and God-Fearers in the Holy City of Aphrodite.” Biblical Archaeology Review 12, 5 (1986).
By March 31, 2016 Read More →

Robert F. Tannenbaum. “Jews and God-Fearers in the Holy City of Aphrodite.” Biblical Archaeology Review 12, 5 (1986).

A quiet, fertile valley folded into the Mediterranean hills, clear streams, tall poplars, ancient ruins more than 1,400 years old—a picture of pastoral quiet. Twenty-five years ago Kenan T. Erim, archaeologist and art historian at New York University, decided that the site of the ancient Roman city of Aphrodisias had more to offer than that. […]

Posted in: Greco-Roman Period
Letizia Pitigliani. “A Rare Look at the Jewish Catacombs of Rome.” Biblical Archaeology Review 6, 3 (1980).
By March 30, 2016 Read More →

Letizia Pitigliani. “A Rare Look at the Jewish Catacombs of Rome.” Biblical Archaeology Review 6, 3 (1980).

No one seems to know why it is so difficult to see the Jewish catacombs of Rome. But it is. The 1929 Concordat between the Italian Fascist government and the Vatican gave the Vatican control over all the catacombs of Italy—Christian, Jewish, and pagan. A recent report in Commentary magazine described the process of gaining […]

Posted in: Greco-Roman Period
Huge Tomb in Egypt May Hold Pharaoh’s Firstborn
By March 30, 2016 Read More →

Huge Tomb in Egypt May Hold Pharaoh’s Firstborn

Archaeologists have discovered a tomb they believe was the burial place of Ramesses II’s sons, in the Valley of the Kings, the necropolis at Karnak some 300 miles south of Cairo. The huge tomb complex, dubbed Tomb 5, is many times larger than any other tomb so far discovered and the only one known to […]

Posted in: Exodus
Power to the Powerless—A Long-Lost Song of Miriam
By March 30, 2016 Read More →

Power to the Powerless—A Long-Lost Song of Miriam

According to the Book of Exodus, after the miracle at the Red Sea—the Israelites have passed through dry-shod and the Egyptians have drowned—Moses and the Israelites sing a victory hymn (Exodus 15:1–19). Immediately following the Song of the Sea, as it is called,a is the Song of Miriam: “Then Miriam the prophet, the sister of […]

Posted in: The Exodus
Robert S. MacLennan. “In Search of the Jewish Diaspora.” Biblical Archaeology Review 22, 2 (1996).
By March 29, 2016 Read More →

Robert S. MacLennan. “In Search of the Jewish Diaspora.” Biblical Archaeology Review 22, 2 (1996).

We have been looking for an ancient Roman Period synagogue, dating from the first to third century C.E., in the former Soviet Union. Sound crazy? If your answer is “yes,” you won’t be the first to be surprised that a thriving, diverse Jewish community lived in the Crimea when this area was part of the […]

Posted in: Greco-Roman Period
Pomegranate Scepters and Incense Stand with Pomegranates Found in Priest’s Grave
By March 29, 2016 Read More →

Pomegranate Scepters and Incense Stand with Pomegranates Found in Priest’s Grave

BAR recently published a beautifully carved ivory pomegranate with an important inscription on it. As partially reconstructed, the engraved inscription around the neck of the pomegranate reads as follows: “Belonging to the House of Yahweh, Holy to the Priests.” Based on this reading, many scholars have concluded that the ivory pomegranate originally came from the Jerusalem Temple […]

Posted in: The Exodus
John S. Crawford. “Multiculturalism at Sardis.” Biblical Archaeology Review 22, 5 (1996).
By March 28, 2016 Read More →

John S. Crawford. “Multiculturalism at Sardis.” Biblical Archaeology Review 22, 5 (1996).

Christian anti-Semitism in the Byzantine period (312–1453 C.E.) is well documented—in legal codes, in religious and secular literature, and in iconographic depictions.(1) The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium describes the situation: [Jews] lived among a triumphant, arrogant, and multi-ethnic Christian population whose literature, religion, liturgy, and art derived in part from Jewish sources. [Jews] experienced anti-Semitism […]

Posted in: Greco-Roman Period
Pharaoh’s Workers- How the Israelites Lived in Egypt, Leonard and Barbara Lesko, BAR 25-01, Jan-Feb 1999.
By March 23, 2016 Read More →

Pharaoh’s Workers- How the Israelites Lived in Egypt, Leonard and Barbara Lesko, BAR 25-01, Jan-Feb 1999.

Whatever doubts scholars may entertain about the historicity of the Exodus, memories of an Israelite sojourn in Egypt seem too sharply etched to dismiss out of hand. The Biblical account simply contains too many accurate details and bears too many correspondences with Egyptian records to ignore. And although in our current state of knowledge we […]

Mishnah Yevamot 16-7- The Tannaitic Tradition  in Babylonia
By March 23, 2016 Read More →

Mishnah Yevamot 16-7- The Tannaitic Tradition in Babylonia

Rabbi Akiva met a tanna in Babylonia, Nehemiah of Bet Deli, who had been a student of Rabban Gamliel I in the Land of Israel. He was still able to transmit traditions from his teacher that were not known in the Land of Israel. Rabbi Akiva said, “When I went down to Nehardea (133) to […]