By April 7, 2008 0 Comments Read More →

Northward Expansion

 

  1. Overview
    1. Overview- Northward Expansion
  2. Primary sources
    1. Koen, E.M. Notarial Records Pertaining to the Portuguese Jews in Amsterdam up Till 1639.” ##Studia Rosenthaliana 15, no. 2 (1981)- 245-255, seriatum.
    2. Studia Rosenthaliana 10, no. 2 (1976)- 214-231.
    3. Studia Rosenthaliana 12, no. 1 (1978)- 158-179; Studia Rosenthaliana 13, no. 1 (1979)- 101-114.
    4. Studia Rosenthaliana 14, no. 1 (1980)- 72-102.
    5. Studia Rosenthaliana 16, no. 1 (1982)- 61-84.
    6. Studia Rosenthaliana 18, no. 2 (1984)- 159-176.
    7. Studia Rosenthaliana 19, no. 2 (1985)- 174-184.
    8. Studia Rosenthaliana 20, no. 1 (1986)- 109-130.
    9. Studia Rosenthaliana 21, no. 1 (1987)- 105-203.
    10. Studia Rosenthaliana 31, no. 1 (1997)- 139-151.
    11. Salomon, H.P. “The ‘De Pinto’ Manuscript- A Seventeenth-Century Marrano Family History,” Studia Rosenthaliana 9 (1975), 1-62.
    12. Sarraga, Marian. “Early Links between Amsterdam, Hamburg and Italy- Epitaphs from Hamburg’s Old Sephardic Cemetery.” Studia Rosenthaliana 34, no. 1 (2000)- 41-42.
    13. Haag Jewish Community Minute Book, Stefan Litt, University of Duesseldorf, Germany
    14. Brown, Kenneth. “Spanish, Portuguese, and Neo-Latin Poetry Written and/or Published by Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Sephardim from Hamburg and Frankfurt (1).” Sefarad 59, no. 1 (1999)- 3-42. Abstract- Reproduces and evaluates Spanish, Portuguese, and Neo-Latin poetry written by 17th- and 18th-century Hamburg-based Sephardim. Considered in isolation these poems are, at best, circumstantial and of limited creative significance, but when considered as part of a pan-European literary phenomenon they represent an attempt to create a new literary discourse.
    15. Brown, Kenneth, and Reyes Bertolín Cebrián. “Spanish, Portuguese, and Neo-Latin Poetry Written and/or Published by Seventeenth-,Eighteenth-, and Nineteenth-Century Sephardim from Hamburg and Frankfurt (2).” Sefarad 60, no. 2 (2000)- 227-253. Abstract- Preface to the publication of ten Sephardic-authored or attributed poems published in Frankfurt am Main between 1617 and 1785, seven rhymed funerary inscriptions from the BetaHaim Cemetery in Hamburg written between 1622 and 1813, and four personal letters written between 1626 and 1644 (see entry 53-19286). Known authors of these works include doctors Jacob Rosales (1588-1662), Abraham Zacuto (1575-1642), Rodrigo de Castro (David Nehamías; 1546-1627), and Benito de Castro (Baruch Nehamías; 1597-1684).
  3. Secondary sources
    1. Bodian, Miriam. “Amsterdam, Venice, and the Marrano Diaspora,” in Dutch Jewish History 2, Jerusalem 1989, 47-65.
    2. Bodian, Miriam. “’Men of the Nation’- The Shaping of ‘Converso’ Identity in Early Modern Europe,” Past and Present 143 (1994), 48-76.
    3. Israel, Jonathan. “Lopo Ramirez (David Curiel) and the Attempt to Establish a Sephardi Community in Antwerp in 1653-1654.” Studia Rosenthaliana 28, no. 1 (1994)- 99-119.
    4. Bodian, Miriam. “Spain and the Dutch Sephardim, 1609-1660.” Studia Rosenthaliana 12, no. 1 (1978)- 1-61.
    5. Bodian, Miriam. “An Amsterdam Jewish Merchant of the Golden Age- Jeronimo Nunes Da Costa (1620-1697), Agent of Portugal in the Dutch Republic.” Studia Rosenthaliana 18, no. 1 (1984)- 21-40.
    6. Bodian, Miriam. “The Diplomatic Career of Jeronimo Nunes Da Costa- An Episode in Dutch-Portuguese Relations of the Seventeenth Century.” Bijdragen en Mededelingen betreffende de Geschiedenis der Nederlanden 98, no. 2 (1983)- 167-190.
    7. Bodian, Miriam. “The Economic Contribution of Dutch Sephardi Jewry to Holland’s Golden Age, 1595-1713.” Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis 96, no. 4 (1983)- 505-535. YES
    8. Bodian, Miriam. European Jewry in the Age of Mercantilism, 1550-1750– Oxford U. Pr., 1985.
    9. Bodian, Miriam.”Manuel Lopez Pereira of Amsterdam, Antwerp and Madrid- Jew, New Christian, and Advisor to the Conde-Duque Olivares.” Studia Rosenthaliana 19, no. 2 (1985)- 109-126.
    10. Bodian, Miriam. “Sephardic Immigration into the Dutch Republic, 1595-1672.” Studia Rosenthaliana 23 (1989).
    11. Bodian, Miriam. “Some Further Data on the Amsterdam Sephardim and Their Trade with Spain During the 1650s.” Studia Rosenthaliana 14, no. 1 (1980)- 7-19.
    12. Bodian, Miriam. “Spanish Wool Exports and the European Economy, 1610-40.” Economic History Review 33, no. 2 (1980)- 193-211.
    13. Kaplan, Yosef. “The Travels of Portuguese Jews from Amsterdam to the ‘Lands of Idolatry’ (1644-1724),” in Y. Kaplan, ed., Jews and Conversos – Studies in Society and the Inquisition, Jerusalem 1985, 197-224.
    14. Katz, David. “English Redemption and the Jewish Readmission in 1656,” Journal of Jewish Studies 34 (1983), 73-91.
    15. Swetschinski, “Kinship and Commerce- The Foundations of Portuguese Jewish Life in Seventeenth-Century Holland,” Studia Rosenthaliana 15 (1981), 58-74.
  4. Images
    1. Takanot de-Hevrah Kadisha…Ashkenazim be-Amshterdam, Amsterdam- Proops, 1776, BM712.H42 1776, Title page (colored).
    2. Elegy, Isaac Nieto for David Nieto, London, 1728, BM744.3.N5 1728, Title page.
    3. Humble Addresses of Menasseh Ben Israel (London, 1655), DS135.E5 M31 1655, Title page.
    4. Jewish Kalendar, Isaac Abendana, Oxford, 1698, SHF 1297-1, Title page.
    5. Mateh Dan ve-kuzari helek sheni, David Nieto, London, 1714, BM648.N5 1714, Title page.
    6. Mikveh Yisrael, Menasseh ben Israel, Amsterdam, 1650, DS131.M3145 1650, Title page.
    7. Narrative of the late proceeds at White-hall, concerning the Jews…London, 1656, DS135.E5 J47 1656, Page 1.
    8. Parafrasis Comentado Sobre el Pantaeuco, Isaac Aboab da Fonseca, Amsterdam, 1681, RB1787-17, Title page.
    9. Piedra Gloriosa, Menasseh ben Israel, Amsterdam, 1655, RB266-8. Insert pages 5, 87, 160, 188, 189.
    10. Proceedings at large in the Arches Court of Canterbury- between Mr. Jacob Mendes Da Costa, and Mrs. Catherine Da Costa Villa Real…relating to a marriage contract… (London,) 1734, KD762.D3 1734, Title page.
    11. Several miscellaneous and weighty cases of conscience learnedly and judiciously resolved… Thomas Barlow, London, 1692, BV4615.B3 1692, Title page.

Posted in: Early Modern Period

Post a Comment