From Herod the Great and the Herodians to Direct Roman Rule

Model of Herod the Great’s Temple Mount, the Israel Museum
By December 3, 2015 Read More →

Model of Herod the Great’s Temple Mount, the Israel Museum

Herod’s largest and most beautiful project was the rebuilding of the Jerusalem Temple. He began in 20/19 B.C.E., yet work on the details was still proceeding long after his death when the Temple was destroyed by the Romans in 70 C.E.

David Jacobson. “Herod’s Roman Temple.” Biblical Archaeology Review 28, 2, (2002).
By December 3, 2015 Read More →

David Jacobson. “Herod’s Roman Temple.” Biblical Archaeology Review 28, 2, (2002).

For King Solomon’s Temple, the Phoenician king, Hiram of Tyre, supplied not only construction materials and masons (1 Kings 5:1–12) but apparently the architectural plan as well. The structure, as it is described in the Bible, is clearly a Syro-Phoenician building, for which archaeology has found several parallels in that cultural sphere.a Solomon made use […]

Robert J. Bull. “Caesarea Maritima- The Search for Herod’s City.” Biblical Archaeology Review 8, 3 (1982).
By December 3, 2015 Read More →

Robert J. Bull. “Caesarea Maritima- The Search for Herod’s City.” Biblical Archaeology Review 8, 3 (1982).

Herod, the ancient world’s master builder, constructed a magnificent port city on the Mediterranean coast of Palestine. He called it Caesarea in honor of his Roman patron Augustus Caesar. Maritima distinguished it from the many other cities that bore this much honored name, notably Caesarea Philippa, another city in Herod’s kingdom, located inland at the […]

Kenneth G. Holum. “Building Power.” Biblical Archaeology Review 30, 5 (2004).
By December 3, 2015 Read More →

Kenneth G. Holum. “Building Power.” Biblical Archaeology Review 30, 5 (2004).

The Politics of Architecture In 44 C.E., the Jewish king Agrippa, king of Judea, stood in the theater of Caesarea, clothed in a garment woven of silver threads that glittered in the first rays of sunlight. To those who looked upon him, he seemed awesome and terrible. The spectators were the leading men of the […]

Nahman Avigad. “Jerusalem Flourishing—A Craft Center for Stone, Pottery, and Glass.” Biblical Archaeology Review 9 ,6 (1983).
By December 3, 2015 Read More →

Nahman Avigad. “Jerusalem Flourishing—A Craft Center for Stone, Pottery, and Glass.” Biblical Archaeology Review 9 ,6 (1983).

If Jerusalem is famous for one thing, it is for being a religious center. But our interest in the Holy Cities lies also in its everyday life, of which so little is known. Recent investigations revealed that in ancient times, especially in the late Second Temple period (50 B.C.–70 A.D.), various arts and crafts, such […]

Steven Fine. “Why Bone Boxes?” Biblical Archaeology Review 27, 5 (2001).
By December 3, 2015 Read More →

Steven Fine. “Why Bone Boxes?” Biblical Archaeology Review 27, 5 (2001).

Splendor of Herodian Jerusalem reflected in burial practices People who hear of it for the first time are always surprised: Ancient Jews practiced secondary burial, gathering into bone boxes called ossuaries the bones of their dead a year or so after death, when the flesh had desiccated and fallen off. Ossilegium, as scholars call it […]

Aaron Demsky. “When the Priests Trumpeted the Onset of the Sabbath.” Biblical Archaeology Review 12, 6 (1986).
By December 3, 2015 Read More →

Aaron Demsky. “When the Priests Trumpeted the Onset of the Sabbath.” Biblical Archaeology Review 12, 6 (1986).

A monumental Hebrew inscription from the ancient Temple Mount recalls the signal One of the most magnificent finds from the excavation adjacent to the Temple Mount—directed since 1968 by Professor Benjamin Mazar of the Hebrew University—is a monumental Hebrew inscription carved in stone. The eight-foot-long inscribed stone once graced the topmost pinnacle of the Temple […]

Kathleen Ritmeyer and Leen Ritmeyer. “Reconstructing Herod’s Temple Mount in Jerusalem.” Biblical Archaeology Review 15, 6 (1989).
By December 3, 2015 Read More →

Kathleen Ritmeyer and Leen Ritmeyer. “Reconstructing Herod’s Temple Mount in Jerusalem.” Biblical Archaeology Review 15, 6 (1989).

Herod the Great—master builder! Despite his crimes and excesses, no one can doubt his prowess as a builder. One of his most imposing achievements was in Jerusalem. To feed his passion for grandeur, to immortalize his name and to attempt to win the loyalty of his sometimes restive Jewish subjects, Herod rebuilt the Temple (1 […]

Meir Ben-Dov.“Herod’s Mighty Temple Mount.” Biblical Archaeology Review 12, 6 (1986).
By December 3, 2015 Read More →

Meir Ben-Dov.“Herod’s Mighty Temple Mount.” Biblical Archaeology Review 12, 6 (1986).

Archaeology vividly recreates bustle of pilgrims two thousand years ago Solomon’s temple was destroyed by the Babylonians in 586 B.C. when they conquered Jerusalem. A half century later, the returning exiles, under the leadership of Ezra and Nehemiah, built the Second Temple, a modest structure that gradually fell into disrepair. This temple was remodeled and […]

Josephus, War I, 386-673- Personal Life and Rule of Herod
By December 3, 2015 Read More →

Josephus, War I, 386-673- Personal Life and Rule of Herod

Only a small part of the account of Herod’s long and complex reign by Josephus can be presented here. Like the previous excerpt, it was authored by the statesman and historian Nicolaus of Damascus and taken over virtually verbatim by Josephus. For this reason, it tends to be very favorable to Herod, even excusing some […]